Transportation & Transit

Transportation & Transit

Households in low income areas typically own fewer vehicles, have longer commute times and higher transport costs. It is important to ensure that lower income residents do not bear the burden of higher transport costs as policies such as emission charges are contemplated to address climate changes. Oregon Clean Energy Jobs Bill provides a cap on greenhouse gas emissions and will attempt to address this. Lower income populations often rely on public transportation to access shopping and places of employment, yet ease of access and cost of ridership may create barriers for some residents. Housing and transit access are intertwined – affordable housing options limit the transportation options that low-income residents have, so climate solutions must also address the urban form. The funds generated from the Oregon Transportation Bill, are allocated to expanding TriMet bus service and frequency to communities with high concentrations of low-income households and implementing a low-income fare program. Adults at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level are eligible for the reduced fare program which started July 2018.

Neighborhoods in the U.S. are often very segregated due to the legacy of former federal housing policies. Affordable housing reduces greenhouse gas emissions by helping low income residents live in areas served by transit, sidewalks and bikeways. Transit systems and multi-modal communities must meet the needs of families, immigrant communities, an aging population, people with disabilities, and low-income residents. However, an undeveloped system can often lead to safety and “last mile” challenges – meaning that it is inconvenient and or time consuming to complete the whole trip. The City of Beaverton’s Transportation Division is working on innovative solutions for the ‘last mile” including bike and scooter hire as well as autonomous bus transfers for large employers.